Bookworm Blogging, Monthly Wrap-Ups

July 2021 Wrap-Up

i have been absolutely exhausted and incredibly busy, so i’ve spent fairly little time reading over the last month unfortunately! i did go on a nice vacation that i have lots of fun pictures of to share. hope you all have been enjoying your summer (or winter, if you’re in the southern hemisphere!)

Books Read:

  • Brood by Jackie Polzin. 3.5 stars.

Books read: 1 book
Average rating: 3.5 stars

Other Media:

Short Reads/Watches:

My Month in Photos:

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Bookworm Blogging, Monthly Wrap-Ups

June 2021 Wrap-Up

yay, i’ve finally been reading!! dogsitting has helped me balance reading and gaming a lot more, since i’m away from my PC lol. my reading in July may not be as comparable since i’m going on a social vacation, but we’ll see. how was your June??

Books Read:

  • The Death of Vivek Oji by Akwaeke Emezi. 4 stars.
  • Bitterblue by Kristin Cashore. 2 stars, reread, review.
  • House of Hollow by Krystal Sutherland. 4.5 stars, review.
  • The Girl With All the Gifts by M.R. Carey. 4 stars, review.
  • Winterkeep by Kristin Cashore. 2 stars, review.
  • No One is Talking About This by Patricia Lockwood. 4.5 stars, review.
  • The Bass Rock by Evie Wyld. 4 stars, review-ish.
  • Haze by Rebecca Crunden. 2 stars.
  • Cool for the Summer by Dahlia Adler. 4.5 stars, RTC.

Books read: 9 books
Average rating: 3.5 stars

Other Media:

  • Movies:
  • TV Shows:
    • RuPaul’s Drag Race, Season 5, Season 1 Eps 1-2
    • RuPaul’s Drag Race: Untucked!, Season 4.
    • The Bachelorette, Season 17 Eps 1-3.

Short Reads/Watches:

My Month in Photos:

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Book Reviews, Bookworm Blogging

No One is Talking About This [review]

This post contains affiliate links; if you use these links to make a purchase, I may earn a commission. Thanks for reading!

No One is Talking About This by Patricia Lockwood
Published by Riverhead Books on February 16, 2021
my rating: ★★★★.5 (4.5 stars)
Goodreads avg:
3.74 (as of 2021-06-21)
Spoiler-free review

Goodreads | Bookshop

This ended up being an incredibly impactful read for me, although I wouldn’t have known that from the start. I went into this relatively cold, knowing only that it had ‘two parts’ and had a lot to do with online culture. Both of those things are very true, but what I wasn’t prepared for was how absolutely this would destroy me.

The first part reads much like a Twitter feed and contains plenty of internet humor; I was nearly cackling at both how relatable it felt and how Lockwood was able to condense and present these collective internet experiences. If you are not capital-O Online, I worry that you’ll be lost and/or hate this. If you hate books about the internet, definitely do not read this. I personally found it to be a unique take on tackling the intricacies of modern technology and was looking forward to seeing where Lockwood took it.

Enter, Part 2. I had absolutely no idea where Part 2 was going to go and won’t discuss it too thoroughly because I think going in without expectations will give it the biggest impact. Let me just say that I think Part 1 sets the stage perfectly for the tragedy that unfolds in Part 2. It provides the foundation to understand how the narrator copes and to see the lens she views the world through.

I feel like this will be a divisive book so I hesitate to recommend it to anyone who isn’t fully convinced by the concept. I struggled myself a little bit towards the beginning to read this in anything other than small bits. But close to Part 2, I was able to sit down and and carefully inhale the rest. I really, really enjoyed this though and very much look forward to reading more by Lockwood.

content warnings: see Goodreads review



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Book Reviews, Bookworm Blogging

The Girl With All the Gifts [review]

This post contains affiliate links; if you use these links to make a purchase, I may earn a commission. Thanks for reading!

The Girl With All the Gifts by M.R. Carey, narrated by Finty Williams
Published by Hachette Audio on June 6, 2014
my rating: ★★★★ (4 stars)
Goodreads avg:
3.94 (as of 2021-06-15)
Spoiler-free review

Goodreads | Bookshop


I went into this knowing pretty much nothing except that the general plot ‘zombies but different’ and think that was the right way to do it. I think this was an incredibly creative take on the zombie genre and was very impressed with the science of it — although I can’t attest to how accurate it was. I really loved Melanie and getting to know the rest of the characters was great as well. My only pet peeve was that it was very apparent that this was written by a man; there were bits where the group would be in life-or-death situations and the men would be thinking about having sex or masturbating. The sex and romance felt shoehorned in and took away from the story imo. Aside from that, this was an incredible book that I’ll be recommending quite a lot.


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Book Reviews, Bookworm Blogging

House of Hollow [review]

This post contains affiliate links; if you use these links to make a purchase, I may earn a commission. Thanks for reading!

House of Hollow by Krystal Sutherland
Published by G.P. Putnam’s Sons Books for Young Readers on April 6, 2021
my rating: ★★★★.5 (4.5 stars)
Goodreads avg:
4.18 (as of 2021-06-07)
Spoiler-free review

Goodreads | Bookshop


This is by far one of the most inventive and well-written YA horror novels I have ever read. I picked it up after seeing Sarah rave about it and am so glad I decided to prioritize it. It’s the story of three strange sisters who are plagued by strange circumstances. Emphasis on the strange. I loved how atmospheric this was and how I felt truly wrapped up in the story; I probably would have read it all in one sitting had I not started it so late. While I wondered for a bit how it would all wrap up, the ending was truly better than anything I could have expected. I highly recommend this if you’re a fan of horror — although I’d steer quite clear if body horror bothers you at all.

content warnings: body horror; sexual assault; kidnapping; child death.


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Bookworm Blogging, Monthly Wrap-Ups

May 2021 Wrap-Up

It’s been really nice to have some time off. I still have a slightly busy summer, but get to have some time for myself. ❤ I hope you all have been doing well!

Books Read:

  • Graceling by Kristin Cashore. 5 stars, reread.
  • Fire by Kristin Cashore. 3 stars, reread, review.
  • This Is How You Lose the Time War by Amal El-Mohtar & Max Gladstone. 4 stars, review.
  • I’m Afraid of Men by Vivek Shraya. 4 stars, review.

Books read: 4 books
Average rating: 4 stars

Other Media:

  • Movies:
  • TV Shows:
    • Attack on Titan, Season 2 Eps 9-10
    • The Circle, Season 2 Eps 12-13
    • Criminal Minds, Season 3 Eps 8-20, Season 4 Eps 1-4
    • Teen Wolf, Season 1 Eps 6-11 (rewatch)
    • Shadow and Bone, Season 1 Eps 1-8
    • One-Punch Man, Season 1 Ep 3

Short Reads/Watches:

My Month in Photos:

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Book Reviews, Bookworm Blogging

I’m Afraid of Men [review]

This post contains affiliate links; if you use these links to make a purchase, I may earn a commission. Thanks for reading!

I’m Afraid of Men by Vivek Shraya
Published by Penguin Books Canada on August 28, 2018
my rating: ★★★★ (4 stars)
Goodreads avg:
4.28 (as of 2021-05-31)
Spoiler-free review

Goodreads | Bookshop


In I’m Afraid of Men, Vivek Shraya reflects on her experiences from being “sensitive” and feminine boy who learns to perform masculinity through her adulthood as a transgender woman. She explores how her relationships to and perceptions of men have changed with a bluntness that is educational to those who may not have experienced the intersection of misogyny, homophobia, and transphobia that she has faced. This is an incredibly compelling set of essays that force one to examine how they may be complicit in the ongoing oppression of others.

She describes how carefully her life must be navigated, how she often goes out in public dressed as a man to avoid violence, how she will remove her makeup before leaving a show she’s performed at, how her boyfriend sometimes accompanies her as a bodyguard of sorts. She reflects on how this anxiety, this terror, has weathered her body and her mind:

My fear of men… both protects my body… and erodes it… I have been stricken with numerous freak pains… that practitioners are unable to explain or cure. When they suspiciously ask me, ‘Are you sure nothing happened? You didn’t fall somewhere?’ I want to respond, ‘I live in fear.’

As she reflects on her experiences with men, she notes the women in the background. The girlfriend of the classmate who spit on her, who giggled instead of stopping him. A friend at a bar who told her she should be flattered when she was repeatedly groped. Cisgender women who dismiss her stories of transmisogyny, assuming the oppression they face is the same that she faces. Women with internalized misogyny who continue to tear down other women. As she recounts them, she adds “I’m also afraid of women.”

Shraya’s essays provide unique insight into how boys are socialized and how expectations of masculinity can be damaging, both to boys and men and the people they interact with. She also shares how dangerous life can be for men who do not adhere to our expectations for masculinity as well as for transgender women. This was a short, informative read that I highly recommend. I would love to see a full memoir from Shraya someday and will keep my eye out for more of her writing.


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Book Reviews, Bookworm Blogging

This Is How You Lose the Time War [review]

This post contains affiliate links; if you use these links to make a purchase, I may earn a commission. Thanks for reading!

This Is How You Lose the Time War by Amal El-Mohtar & Max Gladstone
Published by Saga Press on July 16, 2019
my rating: ★★★★ (4 stars)
Goodreads avg:
3.96 (as of 2021-05-27)
Spoiler-free review

Goodreads | Bookshop


I am more sensitive to your footsteps, I think, than anyone alive.

This was an absolutely beautiful novella that I had a difficult time settling into. It took me probably ~30-40 pages to feel like I wasn’t completely lost, but I was still able to enjoy the poetic writing until I got there. A lot of the worldbuilding feels simultaneously intense and quite vague, but focusing on the characters was enough to pull me through. While there is a plot, this feels more like a dialogue than a story for the most part. I truly loved both Red and Blue and their relationship had me equal parts grinning and crying; I genuinely shed tears during the last quarter or so of the book. I’m so incredibly impressed with how El-Mohtar and Gladstone were able to weave this together and know that future rereads will certainly yield more. I look forward to picking this up again in the future!


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Book Tags, Bookworm Blogging

Which of my friends do I read the most like?

Ally came up with this fantastic blog idea that I’m in love with! Here is her explanation:

So on Goodreads, you can compare your books to someone else’s books. Essentially, Goodreads will look at the books on both of your shelves and compare them for similarities. I’m not entirely sure how it works, but it’s a general look at how similar your reading is.

So, I thought it would be fun to compare my reading tastes to those of some of my friends to see who I read most similarly to.

So let’s see how much my friends and I actually have in common when it comes to reading!


Naty: 75% similar

Books we agree on:

  • Supper Club by Lara Williams
  • The Man Who Saw Everything by Deborah Levy
  • Ghost Wall by Sarah Moss

Books we disagree on:

  • The Mercies by Kiran Millwood Hargrave
  • My Best Friend’s Exorcism by Grady Hendrix
  • Bunny by Mona Awad

Barbara: 76% similar

Books we agree on:

  • A Darker Shade of Magic by V.E. Schwab
  • Everything I Never Told You by Celeste Ng
  • Rebecca by Daphne du Maurier

Books we disagree on:

  • The Vegetarian by Han Kang
  • Never Let Me Go by Kazuo Ishiguro
  • The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo by Stieg Larson

Callum: 79% similar

Books we agree on:

  • The Last Animal by Abbi Geni
  • Praise Song for the Butterflies by Bernice L. McFadden
  • The Wicked Sister by Karen Dionne

Books we disagree on:

  • Frankissstein: A Love Story by Jeanette Winterson (I have a lot of Thoughts on this book lol)
  • Ordinary People by Diana Evans
  • Pet by Akwaeke Emezi

Hannah: 79% similar

Books we agree on:

  • The Sea Beast Takes a Lover by Michael Andreason
  • Awayland by Ramona Ausubel
  • I Hold a Wolf by the Ears by Laura van den Berg

Books we disagree on:

  • Vita Nostra by Marina & Sergey Dyachenko
  • Ghost Wall by Sarah Moss
  • Red Clocks by Leni Zumas

Marija: 80% similar

Books we agree on:

  • Rafe by Rebekah Witherspoon
  • In the Dream House by Carmen Maria Machado
  • Luster by Raven Leilani

Books we disagree on:

  • Ghost Wall by Sarah Moss (i pretend i do not see it)
  • Gideon the Ninth by Tamsyn Muir
  • Landline by Rainbow Rowell

Emily: 82% similar

Books we agree on:

  • The Body Lies by Jo Baker
  • Ghost Wall by Sarah Moss
  • The Pisces by Melissa Broder

Books we disagree on:

  • Frankissstein: A Love Story by Jeanette Winterson
  • Ready Player One by Ernest Cline
  • Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children by Ransom Riggs

Ally herself!: 83% similar

Books we agree on:

  • Middlegame by Seanan McGuire
  • In the Dream House by Carmen Maria Machado
  • Wilder Girls by Rory Power

Books we disagree on:

  • Vita Nostra by Marina & Sergey Dyachenko
  • The Silence of the Girls by Pat Barker
  • Stardust by Neil Gaiman

Destiny: 83% similar

Books we agree on:

  • Merry Inkmas by Talia Hibbert
  • Bad Man by Dathan Auerbach
  • Strange Weather by Joe Hill

Books we disagree on:

  • Jane Anonymous by Laurie Faria Stolarz
  • Blanca & Roja by Anna-Marie McLemore
  • Locke & Key by Joe Hill

Rachel: 84% similar

Books we agree on:

  • We Went to the Woods by Caite Dolan-Leach
  • The Body Lies by Jo Baker
  • The Only Girl in the World by Maude Julien

Books we disagree on:

  • A Spell of Winter by Helen Dunmore
  • Penance by Kanae Minato
  • Frankissstein: A Love Story by Jeanette Winterson

Hadeer: 87% similar

Books we agree on:

  • The Light Brigade by Kameron Hurley
  • The City in the Middle of the Night by Charlie Jane Anders
  • Freshwater by Akwaeke Emezi

Books we disagree on:

  • The Pisces by Melissa Broder
  • Trail of Lightning by Rebecca Roanhorse
  • Middlegame by Seanan McGuire

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Bookworm Blogging, Monthly Wrap-Ups

March & April 2021 Wrap-Up

I realized towards the end of April that I completely forgot to do my March wrap-up, so I figured I’d just group them together!

Books Read:

  • The Empress of Salt and Fortune by Nghi Vo. 3 stars.
  • Surviving the White Gaze by Rebecca Carroll. 4 stars, review.
  • This Common Secret by Susan Wicklund. 4 stars, review.
  • Don’t Look for Me by Wendy Walker. 2 stars, review.

Books read: 4 books
Average rating: 3.25 stars

Other Media:

Short Reads/Watches:

My Month in Photos:

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