Not Books, Personal

Boskone 56 Day 2

ICYMI, the recap of my first day at Boskone can be found here. I didn’t make it to day three due to some medical issues, so this is both my second and last post about this year’s Boskone. I also made it to fewer panels on Saturday than I had hoped, but still got to plenty and had a great time! I’m already excited for next year’s. 🙂 In case you all are interested, I’ve got an entire shelf on goodreads of recs that came up throughout Boskone.

The Historical Progression of Horror

My first panel, at 10am sharp! The moderator was Jack Haringa, and the panelists were Deirdre Crimmins, Brett Savory, Tonia Thompson, and the one and only Paul Tremblay! I unfortunately didn’t get a chance to make it to Paul’s signing, but it was still great seeing him speak in the panel! Tonia also saw the cover of my journal prior to the panel and gave me a shout-out as a fellow Twilight Zone fan, which was fun.

The panel began with a discussion of the stimuli that lead to horror, whether related to technological advances or cultural changes. Tonia noted that space is less scary now that we (the human race) have been there and that the focus has shifted back to Earth, specifically a fear of AI and lack of privacy. Paul piped in that the speed at which misinformation can now spread is also a contributing factor to fear and horror.

Deirdre pointed out that modern horror has embraced technology in order to exploit our fears of it, followed by Tonia noting that technology makes writers work harder. No longer can we rely on the trope of no cell service without coming across as lazy. This makes the isolation often inherent to horror a lot more difficult. Paul pointed out that it forces a different kind of isolation to emerge.

As the conversation shifted, the topic of underexplored tropes arose with Tonia’s assertion that zombie fiction has not been explored to its fullest. She talked specifically about traditional Haitian zombies, which have long been used as a metaphor for enslavement. On a similar line, she hoped that hoodoo (distinctly different from voodoo) would be explored as well.

Later in the panel, the concept of the happy ending was brought up. Paul said that he felt a happy ending still needed to respect the experience of the character, and that they could not be able to escape these horrors completely unscathed. Jack noted that it is harder to portray any internal changes in movies, while Deirdre added that on the flipside movies are able to do the heavy lifting in other ways.

Tonia later brought up the differences between US and Latin American horror, the latter of which is more focused on religion. She noted that it would be interesting to see US horror explore religion, or lack of it, a little more. Jack brought up the fact that while we do have horror that explores religion, it is almost always dealt with from a Catholic perspective, and rarely in a contemporary setting.

In Our Own Voices

This panel was moderated by Julia Rios and included John Chu, Kenesha Williams, Tonia Thompson, and Hillary Monahan. Julia started off the panel by asking if the panelists found it difficult to find themselves represented. Kenesha started off by clarifying that in traditional publishing, the answer is yes. She noted that there is more representation in independent publishing. She also brought up the fact that many black stories are limited to oppression stories and historical retellings, and that black people don’t get to be the heroes.

Tonia answered next, sharing the first time she had read a book with a biracial character — in her 30s. “I wept because I had no idea what I was missing out on” not seeing herself in books. Hilary explained that a lot of traditional publishers use a couple non-white authors to say they’re diverse. Also biracial, she talked about how white authors will write biracial characters, but only include the white half of their lives. She spoke about how an author can’t say someone is half something and then never speak to that half.

Julia asked where the panelists tended to find their diverse fiction. Kenesha used Amazon suggestions, whereas Hilary depended mainly on word-of-mouth. She said it’s important to listen to people in the community you’re looking to explore and that she’s skeptical of lists made by people outside of the community. Tonia said she likes to use conferences and conventions to find new authors. Kenesha jumped back in to say tailor facebook groups tend to help listing a few, such as Colors in Darkness.

The idea of writing outside one’s own lane also came up. Tonia expressed her frustration that white people continue to get recognition for writing outside their experiences. Kenesha added that you can tell when a white editor has had a heavy hand in a black author’s work, and that they need to step back and trust the reader. Hilary argued that you can write outside your lane, but you need to take the time to do it right, with research and sensitivity readers.

Near-Future Sci-Fi

This panel had moderator Paul DiFilippo and panelists Fran Wilde, Michael Swanwick, Karl Schroeder, and Brett James. DiFilippo started by discussing an essay from Charles Strauss (“Worldbuilding 404”) where he asserted that looking into the near future was 85% knowns, 10% known unknowns (something will happen, but what?), and 5% unknown unknowns (black swan events). Karl noted that sci-fi must stand as a plausible future, we must be able to see how we got there.

Karl also brought up the question of what happens if you get something wrong that is wrong by the time the book gets published. Michael brought up an incident where he almost wrote a book that involved a nuclear war between the US and the USSR, but decided at the last minute that he thought it would be boring. Sometime between the book’s acceptance and its publication, the USSR had fallen. Fran brought up a more concerning point: what if you get something right and someone uses it as their guide?

Karl argued the importance of near-future sci-fi by stating that setting novels 10,000 years in the future doesn’t help to solve present-day problems. Near-future sci-fi can give us a way to envision solutions to these problems. Michael stressed the importance of having a modesty about what you’re writing and looking just to the edge of the present for inspiration.

Why Diversity Matters

This panel was moderated by William Hayashi and had panelists Gerald L. Coleman, Cerece Rennie Murphy, Carlos Hernandez, and Reiko Murakami. William began by arguing that diversity in media normalizes the actual population of the country, as Cerece stated that “we write the world as it is… it’s time for us to stop explaining our existence.” Gerald also stressed the importance of having black characters with “every person problems” instead of relying on stereotypes to create “black problems.”

Cerece was lucky in that she grew up surrounded by diversity, and didn’t quite know that there were places where it didn’t exist. She said that someone once asked her what made her realize that she could write science fiction as a black woman. It was that moment that made her realize she had never thought she couldn’t.

Gerald and William began to discuss the impact of the Wonder Woman movie on women and girls. They walked out of the theaters visibly empowered, feeling like they could accomplish anything. Some had to wonder, “is this how white men feel walking out of superhero movies?”

Reiko added that, as someone who works in the video game industry, she has noticed the developers’ assumptions about the player have changed. They are no longer catering only to white teenage boys. She also stated that the most important part of writing diversely is doing your homework and showing respect.

Young Adult Science Fiction

Justin Key was the moderator of this panel and the panelists were Erin Underwood, Lauren Roy, Michael Stearns, and Fran Wilde. Justin began the panel by asking why there is so much more young adult fantasy than young adult science fiction. Lauren pointed out that when something is written by a woman, it is less likely to be labeled as sci-fi. Michael also said that the sci-fi label is avoided in YA as it is seen as the death of a novel. This leads to YA science fiction being sold in the general science fiction section instead.

Justin also asked whether sci-fi is encouraging kids to go into STEM fields. He used himself as an example, saying science fiction was part of why he became a doctor. Erin said that having the fiction to lay the groundwork for these interests can be essential. Fran also noted that fiction doesn’t have to be future-looking to be about science, “it’s not just robots and rockets.”

Social Change and the Speculative World

Janice Gelb was the moderator for this panel and the participants were Andrea Corbin, Robert VS Redick, Christopher Golden, and Hilary Monahan. Hilary was adamant that all fiction is political and that marginalized groups writing naturally makes their works political. What you include and what you don’t include in fiction is impacted by who you are. Christopher added in “Ignorance is privilege, and privilege is ignorance.” Hilary also noted that sci-fi and fantasy can put a fun twist on difficult topics, keeping people interested who might have otherwise checked out.

An audience member asked about how economic inequality and class systems are addressed in speculative fiction. Hilary noted that there are very few narratives set around poverty, although there are always exceptions. Christopher noted the Hunger Games trilogy as well as the Red Rising trilogy as examples. Hilary continued, pointing out other social justice issues that aren’t given as much attention: disability, classism, fatphobia. Andrea added that when these are included, they’re often an undercurrent and not the focus.

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Not Books, Personal

Boskone 56: Day 1

Last year I attended Boskone, a sci-fi/fantasy convention right here in Boston, for the first time. Not only did I get to meet one of my life-long favorite authors, but I also attended loads of wonderful panels and discussions. I had intended to write a post detailing each day but alas, only made the one. A lot of the events I attended had a strong focus on diversity of all kinds, which is part of what made me love the convention so much. Needless to say, I was so excited to attend this year’s convention as well!

This year I planned things a little better, figuring out which events I wanted to make it to ahead of time and what time I needed to get to the convention on Day 1. I arrived with plenty of time to check in and read a bit of my current read before my first panel. I’ve written summaries of all the panels I attended, but some are a bit lengthy. Each has their own header so you can skip around to read only what sounds interesting to you!

The Hopeful Future in Science Fiction

This panel contained James Patrick Kelly as the moderator with Muriel Stockdale, Gene Doucette, Fonda Lee, and Steve Miller as the participants. The discussion started with introductions as each panelist shared whether they had a hopeful view of the future or not. They then set into discussing optimism and pessimism and its place in the science fiction genre.

Fonda Lee noted that she felt “science fiction is an inherently optimistic genre” in that it implies that we will be here, even when things go sideways. She expanded on this by commenting that dystopian fiction is less of a genre, and more of a point of view. Lee argued that she could write a story set in the Capitol of Panem (from The Hunger Games) that was utopian; it all comes down to perspective. Gene Doucette agreed with her sentiment, adding that even in post-apocalyptic books the narrator (or reader) is assumed to be a survivor: “the future is going to be the end of everything, but not for you.”

The topic then shifted more towards optimism in the genre, with Fonda bringing up the sub-genre of “hopepunk” which James Patrick Kelly then compared to “solarpunk.” Both of these genres focus more towards cultural shifts as the solution rather than technology. Because of this, “climate fiction” and related stories are written more by authors who tend not to write sci-fi. Kelly also points out that whereas sci-fi as a whole glorifies the power of the individual, these sub-genres focus more on solutions that are the responsibility of an entire society. They are telling us that one person is not capable of making the changes necessary to fix this.

During the Q&A portion, an audience member brought up the question of whether more pessimism in sci-fi may be the result of discordant realities and a shift in the demographics that the genre is being marketed towards. Lee agreed with this idea, hammering home the fact that sci-fi that may have been considered optimistic 50 years ago no longer comes across that way to some; when the spaceships are full of cishet white men, the stories are only optimistic for a certain subset of people.

Overall, I found it great food for thought and definitely plan to explore the hopepunk genre a bit more deeply. Kelly offered the collection Hieroglyph as well as the Better Worlds project from The Verge as recommended reading for these topics.

Medical Ethics in the 21st Century

This panel had Robert B. Finegold, MD as the moderator with Paul Jeter, Julie C. Day, Frank Wu, and Justin Key as the participants. Prior to the panel, Dr. Finegold asked some audience members why they chose to attend this specific panel. As someone who works in clinical research — medical ethics are essentially my whole job. Questions like these (perhaps not always to this degree of intensity) arise on a daily basis in my office, so I’m always interested in learning more.

The panel began with a discussion on the ethics surrounding genetic testing. Frank Wu spoke first about the difficulty surrounding whether to undergo testing for Huntington’s disease, a devastating condition that is passed down genetically. Simply knowing whether or not you have the disease can impact the course of your life. Justin Key brought up the potential impact genetic testing can have if the results fall into the hands of insurance companies, who could potentially discriminate against their clients.

Dr. Finegold then moved onto the topic of genetic editing. A lot of nuances were brought up here: editing the genes of people who can choose (consenting adults) versus those who cannot (fetuses), editing genes to prevent or cure fatal diseases versus editing genes based purely on preference. Underlined here is the fact that genetic editing can and likely will have unintentional consequences that we may not even be aware of for years to come. Key weighed the pros and cons aloud, emphasizing that he was unable to pick a side: we could have the ability to treat chronic and debilitating diseases, but at what cost? He was also sure to add that even now we use medicine to change bodies to fit our own preferences: dieting and plastic surgery are two common examples he gave, commenting that we don’t even know the possible long-term consequences of these.

The last topic under discussion was organ transplantation, specifically how the demand far exceeds the supply and the dilemmas this causes. Key spoke first about how psychiatrists are responsible for evaluating potential transplant recipients for risk factors. While they themselves don’t choose whether someone receives an organ or not, this evaluation is taken into consideration. He noted that it will be interesting to see how machine learning and AI play into this process, essentially whether we will end up inputting all the available data and allowing a computer to decide who receives a transplant. Jeter took this in another direction, bringing up how we must account for animals, ethically, in our medicine.

A few other threads were followed including the concept of opting out of organ donation rather than opting in; populations that may distrust medicine for good reason; mandatory immunizations; and how short appointments and long waiting times both lead to injustice in medicine. I found a lot of these discussions absolutely fascinating and am hoping to seek out some resources to read about them.

Telling Tarot Tales

I took fewer notes in this one, since it was a workshop and not a panel. The workshop leader, Trisha Woodridge, was just great! She emphasized the importance of tuning into your intuition when reading tarot rather than trying to memorize what the cards are “supposed” to mean. We did an exercise where we each spent a minute looking at a randomly drawn card, then flipped it over and wrote what we remembered of it. We went around and described what had stood out to us while she helped us draw out our interpretations.

She then went over some general associations with the cards (minor vs major arcana, court cards, each of the suits) and finished the workshop by setting up a celtic cross spread and using it to tell a story. While the workshop focused less on the storytelling aspect than I thought it would, that’s mainly because 50 minutes is a pretty limited amount of time. I’m really glad I made it to this one and will definitely be using some of what she shared in the future.

Agency and Free Will in Speculative Fiction

This panel was a bit less structured than the earlier ones, with Juliana Spink Mills as the moderator and Gillian Daniels, Rebecca Roanhorse, Greer Gilman, and M.C. DeMarco as the participants. This discussion was mostly about prophecies and the “Chosen One” trope. Mills did a good job of asking some thought-provoking questions, which the panelists took and ran with.

Gillian Daniels cautioned that while this can give the reader a reason to care about the character, the author needs to make it interesting in order to make it compelling. She shared that double meanings and misinterpretations of prophecies are one way to accomplish this. Rebecca Roanhorse added that it helps to confound your readers’ expectations and that you should use what they bring to the story against them.

They went down a few other paths, but a lot of it circled around to the question of how you know whether a character has free will or not. Do the secondary characters surrounding a Chosen One have free will? Do we have free will if confined by the circumstances of our lives? Does your free will cut into someone else’s agency? How do addiction and behaviors stemming from it play into free will? It’s a lot of food for thought and I’m interested in exploring the concept more at some point.


So, that was Day 1 of Boskone! I am finishing this post at 10pm the night of, and am excited to see what the next couple days have in store. You’ll get recaps of those in the next week or two as well. I can say that it was already well worth getting ticket’s to this year’s con.

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Movie Reviews, Not Books, Personal

Movies I Want to Watch in 2019

With the Oscars coming up, I’ve been thinking a lot about the movies I intended to see in 2018 and didn’t. I rarely make it out to the theaters, so I mostly end up watching whatever is included with Netflix, Hulu, or Amazon Prime. I also usually end up watching movies with my sister, so most of the time we choose horror movies or comedies (a weird combo, but oh well). So, I figured I’d take some time to share with you all a few movies I’m hoping to watch this year. A lot are from 2018, but there are some older ones in here as well!

Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse [2018] is everything everyone’s been talking about for the last month or so. This is one I’ll probably try to get to while it’s still in theaters, since I think it’ll be worth it to see it on the big screen!

My sister and I watched the original Halloween in preparation for Halloween [2018] and then… never saw it in theaters. Hopefully we’re able to find it streaming somewhere soonish.

I’ve been meaning to see the original Suspiria [1977] for quite some time now, but the remake definitely makes it feel a little more time-sensitive. So I’m hoping I manage to get to this one sometime in 2019!

I really don’t know how I haven’t seen The Shape of Water [2017] yet. I meant to see it in theaters, and then missed it, and then just… never saw it. Part of it is definitely that my sister has absolutely no interest in seeing it. So hopefully I’ll get to it sometime when she isn’t around, ha.

Gimme that gay shit!!! I’ve been wanting to watch The Miseducation of Cameron Post [2018] since I heard it was getting made into a movie, but just haven’t known where to find it. BUT! It looks like it may finally be on Amazon Prime, so I’ll have to check it out.


How many of these are on your watchlist?
Feel free to add me on letterboxd, as I am always looking for new friends and have been in quite the movie-watching mood lately.

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Not Books, Personal, Video Games

Games I Want to Play in 2019

I was inspired by both Destiny and Avery to do this post. I used to play a lot more video games than I do now. Partly because I had more free time, partly because I read less, and partly because I had a PC in better shape than mine currently is. However!! I now have a Switch and between that and my hit-or-miss laptop, it should be much easier for me to get to games. I’ve already knocked out the main playthrough of Pokemon Let’s Go! but these are the other games I’d like to get to!

While I adored Fallout 3, I never got too far into Fallout 4 or Fallout: New Vegas (both of which I own), so one of my goals is to dedicate some serious time to both of those. Knowing me, I’ll just end up replaying Fallout 3, though.

I only started The Wolf Among Us very recently, so I’d like to finish that. The same goes for Life Is Strange and The Walking Dead!

I just started playing Night in the Woods on the Switch this week and I LOVE IT. This is going to be my current priority.

My friend started raving to me about Hollow Night recently, so I downloaded it to my Switch as well (it was on sale!).

Much like Avery, I have tried and failed to play Stardew Valley on the PC, but I’m thinking the Switch might be the trick! I’ll have to wait until I work through my other games (ha, self control whomst???), but then I’ll let myself give it another shot.


Do y’all have any video games you’re going to try to get to this year? I find them fun and relaxing and am trying to feel less guilt about playing them!

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Not Books, Personal

2019 Non-Bookish Resolutions

I feel a little iffy about New Year’s resolutions, mainly because it feels like they always fizzle out. But there are things about my life I’d like to improve, and now seems like as good a time as any! I’ve made a list of somewhat specific resolutions (things I can actually measure in some way, rather than “work out more” etc.) that I’d like to work toward achieving in the coming months. While the list may seem a little overwhelming, I’ve decided to use the “Monday resolutions” method — I’ll work to implement one of these every week or three and slowly incorporate them into my life.


Journal 4+ days a week

I used to journal religiously every single day, usually 3 full handwritten pages. I don’t know exactly when or how I fell off the bandwagon but I miss it. It helped me to remember things I had been up to, and helped me to organize myself in some ways. I’ve tried to keep telling myself to start up again, but have finally realized it may not be feasible to jump back into journaling every day! Instead, I decided I’d like to journal most days. See how that may be a little easier? This way, I’m less likely to feel like I’ll run out of things to say, and I don’t have to beat myself up if I don’t have the chance to get to it. You’ll see that a lot of my resolutions have been structured similarly.

Exercise 3+ days a week

By exercise, I mean go to the gym for 20-30+ minutes or go running outside. I have a membership to the gym a block from my office so I have no reason not to get back to this one (except for depression and fatigue…). I always feel so much better when I’m actively exercising and if I can do it before work, I don’t have to worry about being too exhausted at the end of the day!

Spend (IRL) time with someone who isn’t my sister 1+ day a week

This is an easier goal than “make more friends” which can feel daunting. But in winter especially, I really need to focus on spending time with others and not self-isolating. I live with my sister so we “hang out” a lot, but I think I would feel more enriched if I made an effort to spend time with others!

Create 1+ days a week

This can be drawing, writing, knitting, etc. I haven’t really been creating in a while and I feel so stale. My friend Marlaina and I have been trying to do drawing challenges but I’ve been terrible about actually doing them. Instead of beating myself up about it, I just want to try to do anything creative at least once a week.

Order takeout and eat out twice or less a week

I’m a takeout fiend, and it is really cutting into my budget! My sister and I recently started doing Peapod, so it should be much easier for me to eat food I already have at home. I started this rule a while ago and fell out of it, but it wasn’t actually too difficult to stick to! I just need to be really conscientious of how much I’m eating out. Usually I’ll try to save it for the weekend and even just cutting out weekdays has helped a lot!

Praise myself more

I’ve always been in the habit of getting down on myself about stuff, so I really want to focus on praising myself more! Anytime I work toward any of the above goals, or do anything good for myself, I’m going to try to praise myself for it. This doesn’t necessarily mean treating myself, or rewarding myself, but just saying some nice things to myself and recognizing any progress I’ve made!


How do y’all feel about New Year’s resolutions? Do you have any you’re going to try out in 2019?

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Not Books, Personal

Hamilton: My Broadway in Boston Recap

In mid-September, Hamilton came to Boston for a two month tour. I’ve always assumed I’d have no chance of going — I’m not sure what tickets looked like before, but the most inexpensive seats for this weekend are in the ballpark of $300 each. My aunt clued me in on the lottery, though, so I downloaded the Hamilton app and entered every single day. It became such a routine thing that I had almost forgotten there was anything at stake.

On Wednesday evening, I was headed home from work and had a notification from the app come in on my phone. I assumed it was the routine “better luck next time!” heads up but to my shock, I had won the lottery! I immediately logged in and claimed my ticket, ecstatic. I texted my closest friends (all Hamilton fans) in disbelief, I posted on Facebook, I thanked my aunt profusely for letting me know about the lottery.

Thursday morning I picked myself out a simple, classy black dress, matched with maroon leggings and black wedges. I did a full face of makeup and went into work dressed to impress. When I got out, I headed over to a coffee shop a couple blocks from the theater to read and get something to eat before the show. Around 6:45pm, I stopped by the box office to grab my ticket, grinning ear-to-ear, and made my way inside. I grabbed a Harpoon cider and waited for the doors to open.

Glad to have beaten the rush (I was among the first seated), I let the usher lead me to my seat at just past 7. I had expected a secluded seat near the back and couldn’t believe it wasn’t a dream when they brought me right up to the second row, congratulating me with a smile. I sat back and gazed at the stage in awe until the show started.

I’m disappointed to have missed the original cast, but the group of actors who performed were absurdly talented, of course. Actually getting to see the visuals enhanced the entire story in a way I could not have even comprehended beforehand. The characters truly came to life for me, and it was so fun to see the different spins that the actors were able to put on them. In particular, Austin Scott (the lead man himself) projected certain lines in a completely different manner than Lin-Manuel Miranda had. Although each character was at their core the same, it is fascinating to see how one person can be interpreted and portrayed so differently — even when restricted to the exact same lines.

Overall it was a truly magical experience that felt like it was over just after it had begun. I wish I had more to say about the play itself, but it really feels like something I would need to see multiple times to even begin to explore in depth. There were so many nuances and points of discussion that flashed through my mind as I watched, but there was no way for me to remember most of them while focusing on experiencing the performance in the moment. All I have left to say is that if you can get yourself to a production, I would highly recommend it.

Book Tags, Not Books, Personal

The Sunshine Blogger Award #2

I was nominated for The Sunshine Blogger Award by Rachel (who also nominated me last time!).

Rachel’s questions:

What’s the worst book you had to read for school?
This is going to sound like a cop out answer, but I don’t know! I can’t remember books that I’ve disliked reading for school, although I’m sure they exist.

Within your own country, where would you most like to visit that you haven’t already been?
San Francisco! It seems like such a nice place and I actually wanted to move there for a while.

What’s the best first line of a book you’ve ever read?
I have a really bad memory for stuff like this. Again, I cannot remember.

Do you have any tattoos and do you want any?
I have four (I keep forgetting and saying I have three, though)! There are definitely more I want, but I’m still deciding. Here are my current ones:

If you watch booktube, who’s your favorite booktuber?  If you don’t watch booktube, what’s your favorite thing to watch on youtube?
I’m an ASMR fiend. I find the videos so relaxing and try to watch them most nights before bed. My favorites are Sophie Michelle and Karuna Satori.

Which classic do you think more people should read?
The Stranger! I’m not big on classics but I enjoyed it, and it’s pretty quick.

What would you consider the most overhyped and the most underhyped book you’ve read in the last year?
Overhyped: Gone GirlUnderhyped: The Pisces, 10000%.

Would you like to work in the publishing industry, or do you prefer to keep books and reading strictly a hobby?
Part of me would like to, but I do think it would have a negative impact on my love of reading.

If you’re a writer, which author’s style do you think is most similar to your own?  If you’re not a writer, which author’s style do you connect with the most as a reader?
I think I really connect with Joe Hill’s style, which is why he’s one of my favorite writers. I just find myself so immersed in his stories.

What’s your least favorite book cover?
I don’t even know how to begin to answer this. Since I recently read The Woman in Black and had to deal with the very bad movie cover, I’ll have to say most movie tie-in covers.

Who’s your favorite actor/celebrity?
My fav celebrity is Griffin McElroy, he’s an angel and he and his wife are honestly relationship goals.

My questions:

  1. Do you listen to any podcasts? If so, what are your favorites?
  2. Do you genre hop when you read or do you tend to stick to the same genres?
  3. What’s the best movie you’ve watched so far this year?
  4. Earbuds or over-ear headphones?
  5. What’s your favorite way to treat yourself?
  6. Do you have a hobby that not a lot of people know about?
  7. Tea, coffee, or hot chocolate?
  8. What’s your favorite kind of weather?
  9. What’s your favorite mythical creature?
  10. What’s your favorite thing about yourself?
  11. Are you a pumpkin person?

I’m tagging: Destiny, Anna, Jenna, Fran, and whoever else would like to participate!

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Not Books, Personal

Podcasts Pt. 2

Last year, I shared some of my favorite podcasts. This year, I’d like to share a few more! Let me know if you listen to any of these, and share any of your own favorites that I’ve yet to include. 🙂

BRUNCH

BRUNCH with DJ Bean and Pete Blackburn

Neurotic pop culture from the original bad boys of podcasting.

Love You Like a Sister: The Podcast

Love You Like a Sister with Sam and Mindy

Do you miss the 90s and 2000s? Do you miss listening to Savage Garden on your DiscMan on the school bus while sipping the sugary goodness of Fruitopia? Do you remember expressing the agony of a heartbreak through a very passive aggressive burned CD shoved in your ex’s locker? Did you murder a million Tamagotchis? Just Sam? Cool cool cool. 

We miss it. So. Much. We want it back. Until we can convince soda companies to produce nothing but Surge, we’re fighting the good fight on our weekly podcast, Love You Like a Sister. 

Wonderful! with Griffin McElroy and Rachel McElroy

Wonderful! is a podcast for joyful and enthusiastic people that like hearing about the passions, big and small, of other people. Each week Rachel and Griffin McElroy will talk about things they love and invite listeners to write in with their treasured items of enthusiasm. Topics may include movies, television, sports, books, drinks, eats, animals, methods of transportation, cooking implements, types of clothing, places in the world, imaginary places, fictional characters, and fonts, to name a few.

Multiamory

Multiamory with Emily, Dedeker, and Jase

We offer new ideas and advice for multiple forms of love: everything from conscious monogamy to ethical polyamory and radical relationship anarchy. We combine the knowledge from our years of personal experience with the best information available and present it in a way that’s entertaining, thought-provoking, and easy to apply to your relationships.

Section 10 Podcast

Section 10 with Jared Carrabis, Steve Perrault, and Coley Mick

Their About section is empty (typical), so I’ll just say that this is an absurdly funny Red Sox podcast presented by Barstool Sports. I’ve met all the hosts at least once (Jared several times) and they’re all awesome dudes IRL. I highly recommend this podcast for all Sox fans!

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(All photos courtesy of the respective podcasts.)

Bookworm Blogging, Not Books, Personal

200 Follower Giveaway!

200follows

I’m incredulous at the fact that I’ve finally hit 200 followers! I am so grateful to be part of this community and am so glad you’ve all chosen to join me on my blogging journey. To celebrate, I’ve decided to do a book giveaway! The prize will be any one book less than $20 on Book Depository. The giveaway is international, but only includes countries that Book Depository will ship to. In order to receive the prize, you have to be comfortable providing me with a shipping address.

There are several ways to enter! To earn entries you can follow me on twitter, tweet about the giveaway, and/or comment on this post. In order to officially enter, please use the rafflecopter information provided below. Good luck to everyone, and thank you again for your support! 🙂

Rafflecopter Giveaway

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Not Books, Personal

Unique Blogger Award 1 & 2

I was tagged for the Unique Blogger Award by both Steph and Rachel. 🙂 Thank you both so much!!

The Rules:

  • Share the link of the blogger who has shown love to you by nominating you
  • Answer the questions
  • In the spirit of sharing love and solidarity with our blogging family, nominate 8-13 people for the same award
  • Ask them 3 questions

Steph’s Questions:

What is the lock screen and home screen on your phone? (I’m just curious)

Lock screen is my roommate’s cat and home screen is… my roommate’s cat. Different pictures. I just love this cat a lot, okay??

What’s something you were really into/obsessed with when you were a kid?

HORSES. I was THE horse girl. Also books, obviously. 😉

What was the best birthday you’ve had?

Last year! I threw a party at my apartment and most of my favorite people were there and there was pizza and drinks and youtube karaoke and lots of laughs. I’ll cherish that party forever. 🙂

Rachel’s Questions:

Where’s the farthest place from home that you’ve traveled to?

Mexico! I went for a few hours once while we were staying in San Diego visiting family.

What is your favorite fictional relationship?  Either romantic or platonic.

Potential spoilers for Six of Crows/Crooked Kingdom and The Raven Cycle ahead???

I am currently OBSESSED with Jesper and Wylan right now. And Blue/Gansey also destroys me.

What is one food that your town/state/country is known for, and do you like it?

My general region is known for maple syrup, and I love it! My dad had a sap house set up when I was a kid and we made our own from the trees in our backyard (we lived in the woods).

I tag:

Avery @ Red Rocket Panda
Ashley Rae @ Thrifty Bibliophile
Wendy @ What the log had to say
Destiny @ Howling Libraries
Danielle @ The Introverted Book Nerd
And anyone else who would like to do it. 🙂

My questions:

  • If you could have ANY (non-fictional) animal as a pet, which animal would it be? In this hypothetical scenario, there are no legal limitations and you are able to give them the best care possible.
  • What and where is your ideal vacation?
  • What is one thing you love about yourself?

Please let me know if you do this so I can see your answers!

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