Book Reviews, Bookworm Blogging

The Education of a Coroner [review]

**Note: I received this book from Netgalley in exchange for my honest opinion. This in no way impacts my review**

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The Education of a Coroner by John Bateson
To be published by Scribner on August 15, 2017
368 pages. ISBN-13: 978-1-50116-822-2
Rating: ⭐️⭐️⭐️
[Goodreads[IndieBound[Author Website]

In the vein of Dr. Judy Melinek’s Working Stiff, an account of the hair-raising and heartbreaking cases handled by [Ken Holmes] the coroner of Marin County, California throughout his four decades on the job—from high-profile deaths to serial killers, to Golden Gate Bridge suicides.

cw: death, murder, sexual assault, rape culture, sexism, racism

It’s been a hot second since I’ve read some nonfiction and I was really looking forward to this book. I plucked it off Netgalley, thinking that it looked fascinating. From the beginning, it reeled me in. I think a lot of us find the concept of death fascinating, and the idea of what follows here, in the corporeal world, isn’t something I’ve thought much about, even though I’ve watched many crime dramas.

For instance, I had no idea what a coroner’s job entails. What I’ve gathered is that it’s a great deal of investigative work and a position that requires intensely strong people skills, observational skills, and strength. Coroners quite literally see it all, and they assist the police very closely in their work when a death doesn’t appear to be natural. It was really interesting to discover how the system operates after a person dies.

As much as I enjoyed Holmes’ anecdotes towards the beginning, things began to feel off to me about a quarter through the book. There’s one specific quote that set me off, in which Holmes completely discredits a woman’s rape allegation by saying that she was too heavy and not attractive enough to have been raped. He also throws in some casual racism regarding the situation.  I have no idea why the author thought this was appropriate to include because, to me, it discredits Holmes as a serious investigator. How many other alleged crimes has he shrugged off because of how a woman looks? He talks about the injustices that the dead face, but how about the living?

Holmes then went on to tell what he thought was a heartwarming, funny story about a late coworker who egged on a bartender by speaking in a “Middle Eastern” accent. In talking about a robbery that he experienced, Holmes explained that he didn’t pull out his gun because the store was “filled with women” who could have been hurt–as if he is only concerned with hurting women. And there was a horrifying story in which a man told Holmes that he was going to kill himself and Holmes did nothing.  In most instances it is required, if not legally then at the very least morally, to inform someone in a situation like that. Not only did Holmes keep this information to himself until after the fact–he also seemed not to express remorse for this decision, which struck me as shady and wrong.

In addition to all of that, I felt super uncomfortable about the fact that the book referred to all the deceased by name and revealed intimate information about their lives and families. Some of these cases were decades old, but some weren’t. I understand that most, if not all, of this information is probably public record, but it just felt really voyeuristic and like it was taking advantage of the deaths of all of these people just for the personal gain of these two men, Holmes and the author.

After these issues started creeping in, the book began to drag on for me. It’s less about the life of a coroner in general and more a memoir about one specific coroner’s career. It is also important to note that Holmes is a relatively privileged man working in an extremely privileged environment (“Marin ranks in the top one percent of counties nationwide in terms of affluence and overall health”) and that this is an extremely biased view of both life and death.

Generally an okay read and maybe something I’d recommend to folks interested in forensics, but I enjoyed it much less than I thought I would.

Thanks to all for reading! Do you plan to read The Education of a Coroner? Please share your thoughts in the comments. You can also find me on Twitter and Goodreads.

Book Reviews, Bookworm Blogging

Lost at Sea [review]


Lost at Sea by Brian Lee O’Malley
Published by Oni Press on July 24, 2012 (originally 2003)
160 pages. ISBN-13: 978-1-93266-416-4
Rating: ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️

Goodreads | IndieBound | Author Website

Raleigh doesn’t have a soul. A cat stole it — or at least that’s what she tells people — or at least that’s what she would tell people if she told people anything. But that would mean talking to people, and the mere thought of social interaction is terrifying. How did such a shy teenage girl end up in a car with three of her hooligan classmates on a cross-country road trip? Being forced to interact with kids her own age is a new and alarming proposition for Raleigh, but maybe it’s just what she needs — or maybe it can help her find what she needs — or maybe it can help her to realize that what she needs has been with her all along. 


Okay, so full disclosure: this book has been sitting on my shelf for I don’t even know how long. Maybe two years? Maybe more? I believe I got it as a Christmas gift and then never got around to it. I honestly haven’t read any Bryan Lee O’Malley except for a bit of Scott Pilgrim in high school (which I’ve been meaning to read in full at some point). I put Lost at Sea on my TBR for the Make Me Read readathon since it’s a relatively short book and a graphic novel to boot. And I am so, so glad I finally got around to reading it!

I get thoughts like:
I look in the mirror and I don’t belong there. I see myself and I look all wrong. Stephanie looks bold and bouncy and fresh and normal, and I look like something else. Too long, too stringy, too pasty, too squarish,
kind of inhuman.

Oh boy, this whole thing hit me right in the heart. Rileigh isn’t flat-out labeled as having depression, but I related a lot to the ways in which she acted and the thought patterns that she had and it felt very similar to my own experiences with depression. It was incredible reading this, feeling like O’Malley reached into my brain and plucked the words right out and put them in the pages of this book.


The illustrations were just gorgeous as well. Sometimes I get distracted while reading graphic novels if I don’t enjoy the art, but I thought this was just beautiful. The style was perfect and I felt things were conveyed very well. I think I posted about a thousand pictures to my Instragram story as I was reading. I can’t wait to read this again after letting in marinate in my mind a little. I definitely highly recommend this book to all and am so glad that I have my own copy, which is something that I don’t usually consider a necessity as far as books go anymore.


Anyway, thanks for reading! Please let me know in the comments what you thought of Lost at Sea or, if you haven’t read it, whether you’ll consider adding it to your TBR. You can also find me over on Twitter and Goodreads.

Book Tags, Bookworm Blogging

#mentalhealthmonday book [tag]

I’m so stoked that Wendy put together this tag!! If y’all haven’t checked out her wonderful blog yet, then you totally need to. You can find it linked below in the rules. I was tagged by her, so here are my responses. 🙂

The Rules:

  1. Credit the original creator, whatthelog
  2. Answer the questions!
  3. Tag as many or as few people as you like 🙂

That’s it! Now onto the questions…

1. Name a book that lifts your spirits, even when times are tough.

2. What book about mental health is on your TBR? Why?

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It’s Kind of a Funny Story has been on my TBR forever, since I’ve heard so much about it. I have about a billion mental health books on my TBR, but I think this one has probably been there the longest (in my mind, anyway).

3. Name a non-fiction book about mental health.

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This is one of several  books by Kay Redfield Jamison on my TBR. Unfortunately, I have not read anything by her yet, but my psychiatrist recommended that I do!

4. Read this, not that – name a book with a good depiction of mental health, and one with a problematic depiction of mental health.

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For a good depiction, I chose Lost at Sea by Bryan O’Malley. I’m not sure if Raleigh is truly supposed to be coded as struggling with mental illness, but her thought processes really mirrored how mine are during a depressive episode and I related really hard to this. It was just a really influential read for me!

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Ugh I wrote a whole review on my issues with this book, and it’s portrayal of mental health is one of them. One of the main characters is a stalker, who literally watches a girl in her sleep and kills an animal for no reason. Everybody just kind of blames it on him being mentally ill and doesn’t really care and it’s, uh, bizarre.

5. Other than reading, what helps when you’re feeling low?

Going for long walks while listening to podcasts, taking a bath, lighting candles, watching something goofy on TV or youtube.

6. Name a book that is intersectional – e.g. there is a character of colour or lgbt+ character with low mental health

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The MC in The Roses of May is a woman of color who is struggling with grief, depression, anxiety, and an eating disorder.

7. Why do you think accurate representations of mental health is important?

They’re important because there are so many misconceptions about mental illness out there! Particularly when it comes to disorders that people consider to be more “dangerous” like bipolar disorder or schizophrenia. I think it’s hard for folx to remember that these are real people, and that they are more than their mental health. It’s also important because it is easier to support people with mental illness if you can understand to some extent what they’re going through, and I think representation helps with this.

8. Name a book about a less well-known mental health condition.

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Okay, another Kay Redfield Jamison book on my TBR… This one is about manic depression (bipolar disorder), which isn’t necessarily less well-known, but certainly less well-understood by the general public.

9. What book would you recommend to someone looking to learn more about mental health?

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I’d recommend The Bell Jar, just because I was really struck by reading it and think it’s an accurate portrayal of depression and how deep it goes.

I tag anyone who’d like to participate! Please tag me in your post or comment the link here so I can see what you have to say. 🙂

You can also find me on Twitter and Goodreads.

Book Reviews, Bookworm Blogging

A Darker Shade of Magic [review]


A Darker Shade of Magic by V.E. Schwab
Published by Tor Books on February 24th, 2015
400 pages. ISBN-13: 978-0-76537-645-9
Rating: ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️

Kell is one of the last Antari—magicians with a rare, coveted ability to travel between parallel Londons; Red, Grey, White, and, once upon a time, Black. 

Kell was raised in Arnes—Red London—and officially serves the Maresh Empire as an ambassador, traveling between the frequent bloody regime changes in White London and the court of George III in the dullest of Londons, the one without any magic left to see.

Unofficially, Kell is a smuggler, servicing people willing to pay for even the smallest glimpses of a world they’ll never see. It’s a defiant hobby with dangerous consequences, which Kell is now seeing firsthand.

After an exchange goes awry, Kell escapes to Grey London and runs into Delilah Bard, a cut-purse with lofty aspirations. She first robs him, then saves him from a deadly enemy, and finally forces Kell to spirit her to another world for a proper adventure.

I’m a little late to this series, but I read A Darker Shade of Magic for the first time recently and I really enjoyed it! I’m actually planning to start in on the second book very soon (I already have it checked out of the library).

They got to their feet, neither willing to walk away just yet, and Kell looked down at Delilah Bard, a cutthroat and a thief, a valiant partner and a strange, terrifying girl.

The characters are wonderful. Kell is incredible and I kind of ended up falling in love with him. He’s a little bit of a rule-breaker, and can be a little obtuse, but he was so endearing and the love in his heart really got to me. Lila is amazing. She’s kind of your typical badass fantasy girl: a rogue, independent and stubborn to a fault, and very good with a knife. She also talks really negatively about other women, which got on my nerves. In spite of that, I really liked her.

It was nice to have a canonically lgbtqia character, Rhy, but he also felt like a negative bisexual stereotype. One of the most prevalent stereotypes about bisexual people is that they’re greedy and will sleep with anyone and that’s basically 90% of Rhy’s personality. All we really see him doing is flirting with people or talking about flirting with people and it’s heavily implied (if not outright said, I didn’t write the quote I’m thinking of down so I can’t remember) that he’ll sleep with essentially anyone. Like, that’s basically how his character is introduced. And that’s pretty much all I remember about him, except for some important plot stuff toward the end.

Overall, the plot was good. The writing was good. I definitely had a good time reading this book. I gave it four stars instead of five because it just didn’t pull me in like a five star book. I’m intrigued to see where the rest of the trilogy goes and I’m glad y’all got me to read it!

Thanks for reading, please share your thoughts in the comments. You can also find me on Twitter and Goodreads.

Book Reviews, Bookworm Blogging

Girl in Snow [review]

**I received this book from NetGalley in exchange for my honest opinion. This in no way impacts my review. Written on July 17, 2017.

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Girl in Snow by Danya Kukafka
To be published by Simon & Schuster on August 1st, 2017
ARC eBook edition, 368
pages. ISBN-13: 978-1-50114-437-0
Rating: ⭐️⭐️⭐️
Content Warnings: Domestic violence, pedophilia, stalking, animal death.

When a beloved high schooler named Lucinda Hayes is found murdered, no one in her sleepy Colorado suburb is untouched—not the boy who loved her too much; not the girl who wanted her perfect life; not the officer assigned to investigate her murder. In the aftermath of the tragedy, these three indelible characters—Cameron, Jade, and Russ—must each confront their darkest secrets in an effort to find solace, the truth, or both.

I haven’t really been looking forward to writing this review, because I have so many conflicting feelings and am not sure I’ll convey them properly–but hey, it’s worth a shot. There will be some spoilers in this review, as that is the only way I can properly discuss my thoughts.

The first thing that struck me was how lyrical the writing was. Kukafka has quite a way with words. Regardless of the content, each sentence seemed to flow beautifully and at times the book felt more like poetry than prose. For most of the book, I had on an ambient playlist in the background which only served to reinforce how beautifully written it was.

The second thing that struck me was how uncomfortable I felt about Cameron, who was clearly a stalker. Cameron is portrayed as innocent, well-meaning, lovesick, and mentally ill. He obsessively watches Lucinda at night and draws picture after picture of her. It’s clear he means her no harm, but he is still an extremely unsettling character and I felt very uncomfortable with the portrayal of stalking in this book–none of the other characters seem to care at all and it is never damned in any way. Cameron also makes multiple negative judgments about women’s bodies that make me extremely uncomfortable and are seemingly without purpose.

Russ is a weak-willed puppet of a police officer. His character development does make him somewhat redeemable, but he covered up the assault and battery that his former partner committed on a young woman, which really doesn’t put me in his corner. There are a lot of instances in this book that demonstrate the ability to love someone in spite of what they’ve done and I think this is meant to be one of those, but I dislike the way it was handled. Russ covers up Lee’s crime because he’s in love with him, we’re led to believe that Lee committed this crime because something happened between Russ and Lee. I don’t love the implication that internalized homophobia caused a man to beat a woman to a pulp because he almost held another man’s hand. I understand that all the characters are morally grey, but we already have enough poor portrayals of lgbtqia characters and I’m not psyched to see more.

Jade was the only main character I could even stand. She had plenty of faults and was imperfect, but had committed no crimes I could not forgive. Her screenplays were random and kind of annoying, but I understood their purpose. She was also voyeuristic, but in a far more acceptable way. I didn’t love her hatred of all other girls, but she seemed to hate everyone indiscriminately, so I gave her a pass on that.

Choosing a star rating was extremely difficult here. I wanted to give it two stars, as I was constantly making faces and shifting around uncomfortably while I read. But I think that discomfort was part of Kukafka’s intent. I don’t love what she used to achieve it, but I can appreciate that she’s a great writer. So I give her three stars for fantastic writing, subtracting the last two for content.

Thanks for reading! Have you read this book, or do you plan to? Let me know in the comments. You can also follow me on Twitter and Goodreads.

Bookworm Blogging, Monthly Wrap-Ups

July 2017 Wrap-Up


Books I read:

  • Arrows of the Queen by Mercedes Lackey (reread). 2/5 stars, review.
  • The Meursault Investigation by Kamel Daoud. 3/5 stars, Goodreads review.
  • Their Eyes Were Watching God by Zora Neale Hurston. 2/5 stars, Goodreads review.
  • Fate of the Tearling by Erika Johansen. 4/5 stars, Goodreads review.
  • Girl in Snow by Danya Kukafka. 3/5 stars, review to be posted August 3rd.
  • A Darker Shade of Magic by V.E. Schwab. 4/5 stars, review to be posted August 5th.

Average rating: 3 stars.
Books read: 6.

Posts:

Reading Goal Progress:

This year I have read 36 books so far! My 2017 goal (for now) is 50 books, which means I am 7 books ahead of schedule and 72% of the way to 50. I’m feeling really good about my progress! I’m also hoping that my first read-a-thon (starting this weekend) gives me a solid boost so that I can up my reading goal again! 🙂

Notable Posts by Others:

  • A Super Basic Guide to Requesting Physical ARCs by Lauren @ Wonderless Reviews – Some good tips! I love that she included a sample email template and shared her experiences with specific publishers. Mostly geared towards Australia, but can definitely be generalized.
  • Top Ten Tuesday: Kinds of Summer Readers by Holly @ Nut Free Nerd – I adore this list! So many fun categories, I definitely fall into a few myself. Take a look and see if you can find yourself on this list. 🙂
  • Pacific Islander Books and Erasure by Anjulie Te Pohe – A topic I haven’t really seen discussed at all and something, as a white American, I really know nothing about. Very educational!
  • Top Ten Tuesday: Reasons to Love Your Library by Holly @ Nut Free Nerd – I LOVE libraries!! My life has changed for the better since I’ve gotten a library card. Also note that most libraries allow you to borrow eBooks as well. 🙂

Blog Stats:

  • I currently have 53 followers, which is up from 43 last month.
  • In July I had 145 visitors, which is 47 less than in June, womp womp.
  • I published 11 posts in July, which is on par with June, but also behind schedule for where I wanted to be.
  • I had 270 views in July, which is 68 less than June.

As I explained in my last post, I’ve had some stressful work stuff going on and haven’t been getting on WordPress as much as I’d like to! This means I made less posts than I wanted, and also interacted with other bloggers less. I feel really detached from the rest of the bookblogging community, so I’m making one of my goals in August to focus more on interacting with others. My second goal is to attempt to post three times a week! I was getting there, until my little hiatus last week, so I’m sure I can do it.

Thanks for reading! How was July for you? Let me know in the comments. You can also follow me on Twitter and Goodreads.

Book Tags, Bookworm Blogging

Down the TBR Hole #2

Back at it again, kids! My TBR is currently at around 300 and I suuuper need to cut that down.

The rules:

  • Go to your goodreads to-read shelf.
  • Order on ascending date added.
  • Take the first 5 (or 10 if you’re feeling adventurous) books
  • Read the synopses of the books
  • Decide: keep it or should it go?

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Octopus: The Ocean’s Intelligent Invertebrate

The visually arresting and often misunderstood octopus has long captured popular imagination. With an alien appearance and an uncanny intellect, this exceptional sea creature has inspired fear in famous lore and legends – from the giant octopus attack in 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea to Ursula the sea witch in The Little Mermaid. Yet its true nature is more wondrous still. After decades of research, the authors reveal a sensitive, curious, and playful animal with remarkable intelligence, an ability to defend itself with camouflage and jet propulsion, an intricate nervous system, and advanced problem-solving abilities.

In this beautifully photographed book, three leading marine biologists bring readers face to face with these amazingly complex animals that have fascinated scientists for decades. From the molluscan ancestry of today’s octopus to its ingenious anatomy, amazing mating and predatory behaviors, and other-worldly relatives, the authors take readers through the astounding life cycle, uncovering the details of distinctive octopus personalities. With personal narratives, underwater research, stunning closeup photography, and thoughtful guidance for keeping octopuses in captivity, Octopus is the first comprehensive natural history of this smart denizen of the sea.

If any of you know me, you’ll know I’m in love with cephalopods and that my apartments is plastered with octopuses. KEEP.

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The Wild Girls

It is the early 1970s. Twelve-year-old Joan is sure that she is going to be miserable when her family moves from Connecticut to California. Then she meets a most unusual girl. Sarah prefers to be called Fox and lives with her author dad in a rundown house in the middle of the woods. The two girls start writing their own stories together, and when one wins first place in a student contest, they find themselves recruited for a summer writing class taught by the equally unusual Verla Volante. The Wild Girls is about friendship, the power of story, and how coming of age means finding your own answers, rather than simply taking adults on faith.

Umm, this sounds beautiful and I absolutely still want to read it. I think I originally thought it was an lgbtqia book and it doesn’t appear to be canonically so, but I’m still moving it up on my TBR list! KEEP.

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This Is How You Lose Her

On a beach in the Dominican Republic, a doomed relationship flounders. In the heat of a hospital laundry room in New Jersey, a woman does her lover’s washing and thinks about his wife. In Boston, a man buys his love child, his only son, a first baseball bat and glove. At the heart of these stories is the irrepressible, irresistible Yunior, a young hardhead whose longing for love is equaled only by his recklessness–and by the extraordinary women he loves and loses: artistic Alma; the aging Miss Lora; Magdalena, who thinks all Dominican men are cheaters; and the love of his life, whose heartbreak ultimately becomes his own.

In prose that is endlessly energetic, inventive, tender, and funny, the stories in This Is How You Lose Her lay bare the infinite longing and inevitable weakness of the human heart. They remind us that passion always triumphs over experience, and that “the half-life of love is forever.”

I’ve heard many good things about this and am still intrigued by it! KEEP.

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The Eye of the World

The Wheel of Time turns and Ages come and go, leaving memories that become legend. Legend fades to myth, and even myth is long forgotten when the Age that gave it birth returns again. In the Third Age, an Age of Prophecy, the World and Time themselves hang in the balance. What was, what will be, and what is, may yet fall under the Shadow.

I vividly remember a cute, drunken college student telling me how good this series was one of the first and only times I went out with the party kids during my undergrad career. I know it’s recommended to fans of ASOIAF and LOTR and I do enjoy the former, but feel like I probably won’t be committing to this series anytime soon. TOSS.

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A Guide to Being Born

A Guide to Being Born is organized around the stages of life—love, conception, gestation, birth—and the transformations that happen as people experience deeply altering life events, falling in love, becoming parents, looking toward the end of life. In each of these eleven stories Ausubel’s stunning imagination and humor are moving, entertaining, and provocative, leading readers to see the familiar world in a new way.

In “Atria” a pregnant teenager believes she will give birth to any number of strange animals rather than a human baby; in “Catch and Release” a girl discovers the ghost of a Civil War hero living in the woods behind her house; and in “Tributaries” people grow a new arm each time they fall in love. Funny, surprising, and delightfully strange—all the stories have a strong emotional core; Ausubel’s primary concern is always love, in all its manifestations.

UHHH, this cover is beautiful and these stories sound amazing!! This is moving up up up on my TBR. KEEP.

Aaaand, I only ended up removing one book, but I did move two to my TBR ASAP list! Which means they will hopefully be read and removed by the end of the year.

Have you read any of these? Do you plan to? You can also follow me on Twitter and Goodreads.

Book Reviews, Bookworm Blogging

Mini-Review Compilation #1

The Fate of the Tearling

This is the final book in the The Queen of the Tearling trilogy and I really enjoyed it! I’d probably rate the books The Invasion of the Tearling, The Fate of the Tearling, and The Queen of the Tearling in order of enjoyment. I didn’t like the first very much, but loved the second, and really liked the third! I thought the plot progression was interesting, although I got confused at times, and I love the characters. I thought it was really nice to see more of the background of the Tearling. I’d definitely recommend this trilogy to fans of fantasy stories.

Rating: ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️

The Meursault Investigation

The three star rating is based on my personal enjoyment of the read, not an objective scale. I would 100% recommend this book to anyone who has read The Stranger by Camus. It provides a fascinating contrast and goes to show that there are many sides to every story. I struggled a bit with the meandering, rambling way it was written, but it served a purpose and it was well-done overall.

Rating: ⭐️⭐️⭐️

Their Eyes Were Watching God

This is another instance where my rating is very subjective. This book is great–it’s just not for me. I struggle with classics and with historical fiction and that’s really why this book didn’t work for me. I also think I would have enjoyed it ten times more if I had read it in a class, as that helps me get the most out of books I wouldn’t have otherwise enjoyed (see: The Awakening and Austerlitz). What I’m saying is, this rating is just for me and stars mean nothing.

Rating: ⭐️⭐️

Thanks for reading! Have you read any of these books? If so, what were your thoughts? You can also find me on Twitter and Goodreads.

Bookworm Blogging, Readathons

Make Me Read It Readathon 2017

This is going to be my first readathon, and I’m super excited!! I first saw this over at Wonderless Reviews and thought it looked like a really cool idea. It’s hosted by Tea and Titles, and here’s the gist of it:

What is #MakeMeRead?

Look at the books you own, either physical, e-book or ones you’ve borrowed from the library and pick out a few you really want to read, or feel like you should read. It’s up to you how many you pick, personally I’d pick a few more than you expect to be able to read in a week. Example: if you think you’ll only read two, pick out five books or if you think you can read seven, pick out ten.

Make a list of these books on your blog, or make a video, or a Goodreads shelf or post a picture on Instagram—whatever is easiest for you. Then get friends, other bloggers/booktubers/bookstagrammers etc. to vote on which books you HAVE to read.

When the readathon comes along, you read the books in the order of most votes. For example, if one book gets 10 votes—you read that first, then the one that got 7 and so on. If there’s a tie, then it’s your preference. The goal is to read as many as possible.

When is it?

This year the read-a-thon will be running from August 6th through to August 13th. You can start reading as soon as it hits 12am in your timezone, or whenever you’d like.

Remember that the idea is to have people vote on your books, so try and get that post/Twitter poll/photo up as soon as possible in order to give your fellow participants the chance to vote!

My poll is below! They’re all books I own and have not read yet (save for one reread) and you can choose up to three. I’m super excited about this and I really hope I’m able to get a lot of books read!!

Are you participating in this readathon? Please let me know in the comments below! And link me to your polls so I can vote too. 🙂 You can also follow me on Twitter and Goodreads.

Book Tags, Bookworm Blogging

Most Read Authors

So Brittany @ Beauty and the Bean Boots (is that not the cutest blog name ever??) did this post on Most Read Authors on Goodreads and I thought it looked fun! To find your most read authors on Goodreads, just go to “My Books” and click on “Most Read Authors” on the left-hand side. Without further ado, here we go!

Lemony Snicket, 14 books (A Series of Unfortunate Events & The Unauthorized Autobiography)

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Tamora Pierce, 11 books (Immortals Series, Song of the Lioness Series, Daughter of the Lioness Series, and First Test) (The cover below is probably one of my all-time favorite book covers TBH)

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Kurt Vonnegut, 9 books (The Sirens of Titan; Slaughterhouse-Five; Breakfast of Champions; A Man Without Country; Galapagos; Mother Night; If This Isn’t Nice, What Is?; Cat’s Cradle; Look at the Birdie)

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Stephen King, 8 books (Pet Semetary; Storm of the Century; Misery; Carrie; Cell; Nightmares and Dreamscapes; Gerald’s Game; The Green Mile)

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JK Rowling, 7 books (I think we all know which 7)

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And there you have it! Are any of these authors on your top lists? What do my top authors say about me? Let me know in the comments. You can also follow me on Twitter and Goodreads.