Book Tags, Bookworm Blogging

#mentalhealthmonday book [tag]

I’m so stoked that Wendy put together this tag!! If y’all haven’t checked out her wonderful blog yet, then you totally need to. You can find it linked below in the rules. I was tagged by her, so here are my responses. 🙂

The Rules:

  1. Credit the original creator, whatthelog
  2. Answer the questions!
  3. Tag as many or as few people as you like 🙂

That’s it! Now onto the questions…

1. Name a book that lifts your spirits, even when times are tough.

2. What book about mental health is on your TBR? Why?

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It’s Kind of a Funny Story has been on my TBR forever, since I’ve heard so much about it. I have about a billion mental health books on my TBR, but I think this one has probably been there the longest (in my mind, anyway).

3. Name a non-fiction book about mental health.

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This is one of several  books by Kay Redfield Jamison on my TBR. Unfortunately, I have not read anything by her yet, but my psychiatrist recommended that I do!

4. Read this, not that – name a book with a good depiction of mental health, and one with a problematic depiction of mental health.

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For a good depiction, I chose Lost at Sea by Bryan O’Malley. I’m not sure if Raleigh is truly supposed to be coded as struggling with mental illness, but her thought processes really mirrored how mine are during a depressive episode and I related really hard to this. It was just a really influential read for me!

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Ugh I wrote a whole review on my issues with this book, and it’s portrayal of mental health is one of them. One of the main characters is a stalker, who literally watches a girl in her sleep and kills an animal for no reason. Everybody just kind of blames it on him being mentally ill and doesn’t really care and it’s, uh, bizarre.

5. Other than reading, what helps when you’re feeling low?

Going for long walks while listening to podcasts, taking a bath, lighting candles, watching something goofy on TV or youtube.

6. Name a book that is intersectional – e.g. there is a character of colour or lgbt+ character with low mental health

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The MC in The Roses of May is a woman of color who is struggling with grief, depression, anxiety, and an eating disorder.

7. Why do you think accurate representations of mental health is important?

They’re important because there are so many misconceptions about mental illness out there! Particularly when it comes to disorders that people consider to be more “dangerous” like bipolar disorder or schizophrenia. I think it’s hard for folx to remember that these are real people, and that they are more than their mental health. It’s also important because it is easier to support people with mental illness if you can understand to some extent what they’re going through, and I think representation helps with this.

8. Name a book about a less well-known mental health condition.

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Okay, another Kay Redfield Jamison book on my TBR… This one is about manic depression (bipolar disorder), which isn’t necessarily less well-known, but certainly less well-understood by the general public.

9. What book would you recommend to someone looking to learn more about mental health?

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I’d recommend The Bell Jar, just because I was really struck by reading it and think it’s an accurate portrayal of depression and how deep it goes.

I tag anyone who’d like to participate! Please tag me in your post or comment the link here so I can see what you have to say. 🙂

You can also find me on Twitter and Goodreads.

Book Tags, Bookworm Blogging

Rapid Fire Book Tag

I was tagged by the lovely Rachel @ peace, amore, libri to do the Rapid Fire Book Tag. And here it is!

Question 1: E-books or Physical Books?

Both for sure! I love physical books, but e-books are perfect for my commute and for books that would otherwise be super bulky (the asoiaf series, for instance). I also NEED my kindle app to read NetGalley books!

Question 2: Paperbacks or Hardbacks?

Paperbacks all the way. Hard covers are nice for decoration, but I stress too much about ruining dust covers and they’re just not practical for me when it comes to actual reading. My books tend to take a beating.

Question 3: Online or In-store Shopping?

In store! Bookstores warm my heart and I love browsing physical shelves. Online shopping just isn’t as interactive and while it can be convenient at times, it just doesn’t cut it for me with books.

Question 4: Trilogies or Series?

Trilogies, just because I have such a difficult time following series! I always forget to keep an eye out for upcoming books and I can lose track of everything real fast. Trilogies give me less to worry about.

Question 5: Heroes or Villains?

It’s a tie for me, it depends on the hero and it depends on the villain!

Question 6: A Book You Want Everyone To Read

House of Leaves by Mark Z. Danielewski. It is a commitment, but it is SUCH an amazing book!!

Question 7: The Last Book You Finished

The Love That Split the World by Emily Henry

Question 8: The Last Book You Bought

Three books at once! Everything, EverythingThe Glass Castle, and One Hundred Years of Solitude.

Question 9: Weirdest Thing You’ve Used as a Bookmark

Um, I’ll use literally anything as a bookmark if I don’t have one on hand. A candy wrapper might be the weirdest??

Question 10: Used Book Yes or No?

Yes! I mean, why spend the extra money on a new book when you can get a used for a fraction of the price? My favorite thing is used book sales at libraries.

Question 11: Favorite Book Genre

That’s a hard one for me! I’m a mood reader so it changes based on what I’m into at the moment. YA is probably my favorite this month.

Question 12: Buy or Borrow?

I need to get back into the habit of borrowing!! I haven’t had access to a library in over a year but I literally JUST got a library card for my local library (finally), so my new deal with myself is that I am only allowed to buy a book if it is one of my absolute favorites and/or if the cover is so Aesthetic™ that I NEED to display it on my shelves. Hold me to this, y’all.

Question 13: Characters or Plot?

Characters! I don’t care how good the plot is if I do not care about the characters at all.

Question 14: Long or Short Books?

Depends on my mood, honestly!

Question 15: Long or Short Chapters?

Short! It’s nice to have little built-in breaks in books. Especially because I like to stop at the end of chapters if I can, so shorter chapters makes that easier.

Question 16: Name the first three books you think of

The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo. House of Leaves. Harry Potter.

Question 17: Books that make you laugh or books that make you cry

Both! Books that make me feel any kind of emotion strongly are good.

Question 18: Audiobooks Yes or No?

No, I usually miss bits because it’s hard for me to stay concentrated. I might try them again someday after I work through my backlog of podcasts, though.

Question 19: Do you ever judge a book by its cover?

Absolutely. I know it’s not always a good thing to do, but I don’t have time to read the description of every single book ever!

Question 20:Book to Movie or TV adaptation?

TV! Movies are usually too short to really get everything important in. My pet peeve, though, is that TV shows usually give the creators a reason to add unnecessary things in or to continue making more seasons even when it’s not warranted.

Question 21: A Movie or TV show you preferred to the book

I can’t think of one off the top of my head, but I hear The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo made a better movie than book (I’m not enjoying it so far so I’m sure I’ll agree with that).

Question 22: Series or Standalones?

Standalones! Same reasons as listed above in the trilogies vs series question. Although duologies and trilogies are doable for me most of the time. And I do enjoy series, don’t get me wrong! I just struggle to read them all a lot of the time.

 

And that wraps it up! I tag anyone who is interested in participating in this tag! 😉

Book Tags, Bookworm Blogging

Top Ten Tuesday: Series on my TBR

Top Ten Tuesday is a weekly tag/meme hosted by The Broke and the Bookish. This week’s theme is “top ten series I’ve been meaning to start but haven’t.”

Earth’s Children Series by Jean M. Auel
The series has 6 books and begins with The Clan of the Cave Bear. I’ve literally intended to start this series for years, but I finally got Cave Bear on kindle recently, so I should be starting it soon!

Six of Crows Series by Leigh Bardugo
This series hasn’t been out for too long but I’ve heard loads of good things and have been meaning to read it. I also got Six of Crows on kindle recently and hope to start it soon.

The Wheel of Time Series by Robert Jordan
This series is so intimidating–there are many books and from what I’ve heard it’s a huge commitment. I’ve also heard the series starts off strongly and then tapers off, so I at least want to read the first couple books.

The Scott Pilgrim Series by Bryan Lee O’Malley
I’ve read bits and pieces of this series, I think, but I’ve never actually read it, you know? Anyway, it looks cute as hell and I know so many people who love it, so I really need to finally get to it.

The Red Queen Series by Victoria Aveyard
Another series I’ve heard loads of good things about, but just haven’t gotten around to yet.

The Dune Series by Frank Herbert
Another intimidating series. I’ve heard these books can be somewhat dense, but I’ve always wanted to read them!

The Outlander Series by Diana Gabaldon
Again, another series I’ve heard some really good things about. This has come recommended to me several times, so I really need to get to it.

A Court of Thorns and Roses Series by Sarah J. Maas
I think literally everyone besides me has read this series.

Book Tags, Bookworm Blogging

Top Ten Tuesday: Father’s Day

Top Ten Tuesday is a weekly themed post hosted by The Broke and the Bookish. This is my first time doing TTT, and I’m excited! 🙂

This week’s theme is Father’s Day. This is perfect, because my dad has had a huge influence on my love of reading. My dad was also a reader for a very long time. He has a great love for Stephen King and all things horror, so now I have a great love for Stephen King and all things horror. For my Top Ten Tuesday, I’m going to list 10 books from my TBR list that remind me of my dad, and are topics that I think he’d enjoy to some extent. Here we go!

Nostradamus: The Man Who Saw Through Time by Lee McCann
My dad has always had a thing for Nostradamus and I got this book for free, so it’s perfect!

Fascinating glimpse into the life and career of the enigmatic physician whose books of prophecy have intrigued readers since their publication in the 16th century. Presents modern interpretations of his most astonishing prophecies-many imminent in the next ten years!

The Clan of the Cave Bear by Jean M. Auel
This is a series my dad has always loved, so I’ve been meaning to read it forever! I have his old copies of most of the series, but don’t have a matching copy of this one. I recently bought a kindle version when it was on sale, so I’ll probably get around to reading it soon.

This novel of awesome beauty and power is a moving saga about people, relationships, and the boundaries of love. Through Jean M. Auel’s magnificent storytelling we are taken back to the dawn of modern humans, and with a girl named Ayla we are swept up in the harsh and beautiful Ice Age world they shared with the ones who called themselves the Clan of the Cave Bear.

A natural disaster leaves the young girl wandering alone in an unfamiliar and dangerous land until she is found by a woman of the Clan, people very different from her own kind. To them, blond, blue-eyed Ayla looks peculiar and ugly–she is one of the Others, those who have moved into their ancient homeland; but Iza cannot leave the girl to die and takes her with them. Iza and Creb, the old Mog-ur, grow to love her, and as Ayla learns the ways of the Clan and Iza’s way of healing, most come to accept her. But the brutal and proud youth who is destined to become their next leader sees her differences as a threat to his authority. He develops a deep and abiding hatred for the strange girl of the Others who lives in their midst, and is determined to get his revenge.

Salem’s Lot by Stephen King
A classic Stephen King book, I don’t think I need to say more.

Thousands of miles away from the small township of ‘Salem’s Lot, two terrified people, a man and a boy, still share the secrets of those clapboard houses and tree-lined streets. They must return to ‘Salem’s Lot for a final confrontation with the unspeakable evil that lives on in the town.

Papi: My Story by David Ortiz
Okay, this one is a little off-genre, but my dad is a HUGE Sox fan, so it still makes sense.

David “Big Papi” Ortiz is a baseball icon and one of the most popular figures ever to play the game.  As a key part of the Boston Red Sox for 14 years, David has helped the team win 3 World Series, bringing back a storied franchise from “never wins” to “always wins.” He helped them upend the doubts, the naysayers, the nonbelievers and captured the imagination of millions of fans along the way, as he launched balls into the stands again, and again, and again.  He made Boston and the Red Sox his home, his place of work, and his legacy. As he put it: This is our f*ing city.

Astrophysics for People in a Hurry by Neil deGrasse Tyson
My dad also loves space and science!

While you wait for your morning coffee to brew, for the bus, the train, or a plane to arrive, Astrophysics for People in a Hurry will reveal just what you need to be fluent and ready for the next cosmic headlines: from the Big Bang to black holes, from quarks to quantum mechanics, and from the search for planets to the search for life in the universe.

The Stranger in the Woods: The Extraordinary Story of the Last True Hermit by Michael Finkel
My dad lives in the woods of New England, has an unbelievable amount of wilderness survival skills, and would probably love to be a hermit, so.

Many people dream of escaping modern life, but most will never act on it. This is the remarkable true story of a man who lived alone in the woods of Maine for 27 years, making this dream a reality–not out of anger at the world, but simply because he preferred to live on his own.

The Book of Cthulhu edited by Ross E. Lockhart
Back to horror!

The Cthulhu Mythos is one of the 20th century’s most singularly recognizable literary creations. Initially created by H. P. Lovecraft and a group of his amorphous contemporaries (the so-called “Lovecraft Circle”), The Cthulhu Mythos story cycle has taken on a convoluted, cyclopean life of its own. Some of the most prodigious writers of the 20th century, and some of the most astounding writers of the 21st century have planted their seeds in this fertile soil. The Book of Cthulhu harvests the weirdest and most corpulent crop of these modern mythos tales. From weird fiction masters to enigmatic rising stars, The Book of Cthulhu demonstrates how Mythos fiction has been a major cultural meme throughout the 20th century, and how this type of story is still salient, and terribly powerful today.

An Indigenous Peoples’ History of the United States by Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz
My dad also loves learning about indigenous folks.

In An Indigenous Peoples’ History of the United States, Dunbar-Ortiz adroitly challenges the founding myth of the United States and shows how policy against the Indigenous peoples was colonialist and designed to seize the territories of the original inhabitants, displacing or eliminating them. And as Dunbar-Ortiz reveals, this policy was praised in popular culture, through writers like James Fenimore Cooper and Walt Whitman, and in the highest offices of government and the military. Shockingly, as the genocidal policy reached its zenith under President Andrew Jackson, its ruthlessness was best articulated by US Army general Thomas S. Jesup, who, in 1836, wrote of the Seminoles: “The country can be rid of them only by exterminating them.”

Dune by Frank Herbert
Sci-fi! He also loves sci-fi.

Set in the far future amidst a sprawling feudal interstellar empire where planetary dynasties are controlled by noble houses that owe an allegiance to the imperial House Corrino, Dune tells the story of young Paul Atreides (the heir apparent to Duke Leto Atreides and heir of House Atreides) as he and his family accept control of the desert planet Arrakis, the only source of the ‘spice’ melange, the most important and valuable substance in the cosmos. The story explores the complex, multi-layered interactions of politics, religion, ecology, technology, and human emotion as the forces of the empire confront each other for control of Arrakis.

That’s only 9, but I kind of ran out of things I thought my dad would actually like. Regardless, I had fun doing this and can’t wait until next weeks’ TTT!

You can also follow me on Twitter and Goodreads.

Book Tags

down the TBR hole [tag]

Alright y’all, I’m pulling this tag from what the log had to say! Overall a good tag, I gotta go through my TBR to weed stuff out more!

The rules:

  • Go to your goodreads to-read shelf.
  • Order on ascending date added.
  • Take the first 5 (or 10 if you’re feeling adventurous) books
  • Read the synopses of the books
  • Decide: keep it or should it go?

Here we go!

Bad Feminist by Roxane Gay
Yes yes yes yes I’ve still been meaning to read this so bad.

Are You My Mother? by Alison Bechdel
I still absolutely need to read this.

Syllabus: Notes from an Accidental Professor by Lynda Barry
Meh, it’s still a cool concept, but I don’t think I’m as into it as I was before. I’ll take it off for now.

Kissing the Witch: Old Tales in New Skins by Emma Donoghue
Pretty sure there’s some lgbtq stuff going on here, so it’s gotta stay!

Kraken: The Curious, Exciting, and Slightly Disturbing Science of Squid by Wendy Williams
I’m pretty obsessed with cephalopods, so this also has to stay.

You can also follow me on Twitter and Goodreads.